John Armstrong

School: Maryland

Worked in Emmittsburg Maryland.

Robert Armstrong

School: Maryland

Son of gunsmith John Armstrong, at least one gun known by him. See Maryland Longrifles by Hartzler

Samuel Armstrong

School: Maryland

Son of John Armstrong. See “Maryland Longrifles” by Hartzler

William Armstrong

School: Maryland

Emmitsburg William Armstrong was a son of the well-known gun and whitesmith John Armstrong. A Frederick County history states that William Armstrong was an inspector of arms at Harpers Ferry for many years. In 1822 he was a master armorer at the Marine Barracks in the Washington Naval Yard. A William Armstrong is listed in Buckeystown, District 1 of Frederick County, in 1833. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryand. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker

John Blackburn

School: Maryland

Emmitsburg Blackburn was born October 17, 1786, and was a son of Alexander Blackburn, He was apprenticed to John Armstrong to learn the gunsmith trade on April 15, 1804, for a term of three years. During the War of 1812 Blackburn was in Hagerstown and served as a private of infantry in a company known as the Hagerstown Militia. Captain George Shrycok led this company, which was part of the 24th Maryland Regiment, to Bladensburg where they found on August 24, 1814. In this same company was Samuel Hawken. Blackburn was one of 11 soldiers from Washington County who deserted in the fall of 1814. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Daniel Boerstler

School: Maryland

Funkstown Dr. Christian Boerstler in 1784 left Bavaria because of German tyranny and disembarked in Baltimore with only a single shilling in his possession. In September of that year he and his wife and six children settled in Jerusalem Town. The name was later changed to Funkstown. One of his sons, Daniel was a gunsmith who advertised in 1808 “Rifle, gun and cannon powder” at the bend of the waters of the Antietam on the National Pike at Funkstown. By 1812 the business was known as Boerstler and Son and in 1816 Jerusalem Manufacturing Company. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Samuel Boone

School: Maryland

Frederick October 8, 1776–Boone to Council of Safety, delivery of gun locks. {Maryland State Revolutionay War Papers, Hall of Records, Annapolis} For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

John Brant

School: Maryland

Funkstown The Washington County Court Minutes of April 1801 shows him as a native of Germany, gunsmith by trade, residing in Funkstown and naturalized in 1799. On April 9, 1799, William Steel, an orphan of Washington County, was bound to John Brent for 3 years to learn gunbarrel making. On September 3, 1798, he purchased from Daniel Kline lot No. 163 in Jerusalem Town, which was later changed to Funkstown. The April 1801 term of the Washington County Court reveals Brant and Christian Hawken had legal actions against one another. Again, in the February 1802 court term there was more litigation between the two. No doubt these actions were over compensation for rifle barrels. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

John Brant

School: Maryland

Worked in Funkstown Maryland. See “Maryland Longrifles” by Hartzler.

Jacob II Christ

School: Maryland

No biographical information available.

Alexander Compton

School: Maryland

Hagerstown Alexander Compton was the son of John Compton who, in 1797, was residing at the Mouth of the Monocacy. John advertised a reward for an insolvent debtor discharged by the Washington County Sheriff in September of 1810. On March 24, 1794, Alexander was bound to John Gonter to learn the art and mystery of the gunsmith business. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Phineas M. Compton

School: Maryland

Grantsville This Compton family came from France and settled in New Jersey near New Brunswick. His father Robert and mother Lydia Brown Crompton, settled in Berlin in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, in 1813. Phineas was born in 1804 and was a tinnier and gunsmith. He married Adeling Glotfelty and lived in Elk Lick Township. They had a son Samuel who was born in 1827. At the age of 13, Samuel entered his father’s shop and learned the trades of gunsmith and tinnier. Phineas purchased 900 acres across the Mason-Dixon Line where his father had moved. Samuel later became a partner with his father but did not move to the Maryland farm but kept his residence in Salisbury, Pennsylvania. Phineas died in 1858. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

William Cookman

School: Maryland

Hagerstown In April of 1841 William Cookman and Joseph W. Keller took over the manufacture of guns, rifles and pistols at the old stand occupied by William Hawken on Jonathan Street between Washington and Franklin. For further reference, see Arms Makess of Maryland. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Thomas Crabb

School: Maryland

Frederick Thomas Crabb was born after 1750, according to the Federal Census Records, and was first recorded in Frederick County in 1795. He was the fifth contractor to sign an agreement to produce Charleville pattern muskets, along with Nicholas White, Jacob Metzger and Christopher Barnhizle. Razin Self was apprenticed to Crabb on January 31, 1803, to learn the blacksmith trade. In the January 11, 1805, Bartgis’s Republican Gazette Newspaper he advertised a reward for the return of Self who was a run away apprentice. In the late spring of 1807 he contracted with the Office of Indian Trade to make rifles, but by March of the following year he had departed from Frederick. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Daniel Creamer

School: Maryland

Taneytown Daniel Creamer learned the gunsmith trade from his brother Philip and in the summer of 1805 he and Philip went west. In 1809 he is shown in the day book of the Cahokia, Illinois, store of Bryan & Morrison as purchasing articles on his brother’s account. In 1816 Daniel and his brother, Casper Jr., sought local employment. Daniel was one of 23 men employed at the Harpers Ferry Armory who stocked weapons. He was paid over $40 per month in 1816. He apparently resided near the Potomac River in Washington County according to the 1820 Federal census. In that same year, he moved to the town of Harpers Ferry, (West) Virginia. Through the years he was recorded as having turned stocks, patterned guns, and stocked, banded and butted guns. By 1835 he was still employed in the stocking department. His son, Robert Creamer, was recorded as being a barrel forger. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Philip Creamer

School: Maryland

Worked in Taneytown Maryland. See “Maryland Longrifles” by Hartzler.

D. R. Deming

School: Maryland

Swanton The village of Swanton is located in present day Garrett County, just south and slightly east of Deep Creek Lake. He was in the immediate area where Abel Browning worked. He was the grantee of land which bordered the town which he purchased on April 17, 1912, from Prudence Friend. This appears to be a parcel of land that had belonged to Benjamin H. Deming. He was the grantor of 1 acre to Burdette E. Lawrence on May 12, 1921. Probably due to non-payment, he was the grantee of this same acre on May 8, 1922. He was the grantor of the first purchase to Andrew and Doris Friend in July 20, 1929. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

John Demuth

School: Maryland

Graceham John DeMuth is listed as contributing 54 rifles to General Hand’s contract at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, for Continental rifles in 1794. On February 16, 1796, apprenticeship records show DeMuth was living in Frederick County, training Henry Koch. The Moravian Church Records reveal Johann Demuth was married to Catharina and a daughter, Sophia Theresia, was baptized on August 27, 1797. During this period there were four Demuth families in the Moravian Settlement at Graceham. By 1828 he was in Bushkill Center, Northampton County, Pennsylvania. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Ernst Dietz

School: Maryland

Hagerstown Ernst Dietz was active in the German Reformed Church where the only language used was German. On March 15, 1786, an indenture in the land records between Jonathan Hager Jr., son and heir at law of the estate of his father, sold to Ernst Dietz of Elizabeth Town of Washington County aforesaid gunsmith lot No. 358. This was signed and sealed by another gunsmith, Alexander Clagett. On April 2, 1789, Dietz sold this house and lot to John Sleigh and the same day, what was probably his shop on lot No. 90, to William Kreps. The April 19 Maryland Herald and Hagerstown Advertiser stated that William Kreps has removed his shop and place of abode to the house formerly occupied by Rust Dietz, gunsmith. In the fall of 1799 a letter awaited him at the Hagerstown Post Office which means that he was probably no longer a resident. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Andrew Eaby

School: Maryland

Sharpsburg Hundred At the request of Andrew Eavey, the following deed was recorded on the 25th day of June, 1770. “Towits, this indenture made the 20th day of June in the year of our Lord 1770, between Jacob French of the County of Frederick and the Province of Maryland of the one part, to Andrew Eavey of the County and Province aforesaid, of the other part… In consideration of the sum 150 pounds current money…part of a tract of land called Huckleberry Hill situated and being in the county and Province aforesaid on a draft of Antietam called Dicktons.” {Frederick County Courthouse, Liber N, Folil 207-207} Patriotic people from this area were some of the first to demonstrate on a county-wide basis for independence. On January 4, 1775, Andrew Eaby represented the Conoccocheague Hundred at a meeting held in Fredericktown concerning the formation and arming of militia. Andrew may have been related to an armorer from the French and Indian Wars named Thomas Eaby. That man was active from Fort Cumberland, west to Fort Ligonier and Fort Pitt. On 22 May 1780 Thomas Eaby “produced a discharge signed by Adam Stephen, Colonel of the First Virginia Regiment, for the Service of Thomas Eaby as an artificer for the time of his enlistment in the late War between Great Britain and France.” {Yohogania County, Virginia Court Records, p.410}. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Lewis W. Ealer

School: Maryland

Baltimore Lewis Ealer was born in 1791 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was in business for himself as a master lock and gunsmith in the Fell’s Point section of Baltimore in 1822. In 1827 he moved to Oldtown. He returned to Philadelphia in 1837 where he continued to follow the trade. In 1857 he went to Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and was in partnership with his son. Franklin A., who was born in Maryland in 1832. Lewis was again in Philadelphia in 1865. He was married to Susanna and had 5 children. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Benjamin & John Ebert

School: Maryland

Frederick Benjamin and his son John were general gunsmiths prior to the Civil War and were located on the south side of Patrick Street west of Bentz Street in Frederick. By the 1880s they were advertising as Benjamin Ebert & Son at 67 West Patrick Street. In 1895 they were advertising hardware and changes. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Samuel Ebert

School: Maryland

Frederick The 1860 federal census showed Samuel Ebert as a gunsmith working in Frederick, aged 27. He was a son of Henry and Polly Tice Ebert, who were married in November of 1822 and both were from Frederick. He may have been related to and the mentor of Benjamin Ebert. For additional information see, Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Samuel Engels

School: Maryland

Baltimore The 1860 federal census for Baltimore listed Samuel Engels as a gunsmith, aged 37, residing at 13 Townsend St., Baltimore For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Jacob Ernst

School: Maryland

Frederick County Maryland. See “Maryland Longrifles” by Hartzler

Jacob Ernst

School: Maryland

Frederick County Jacob Ernst may have been a relative of the gunsmith Adam Ernst. A Jacob Ernst married Mary Smith on June 21, 1758. Jacob the gunsmith was a resident of Frederick County and is included in the 1790 federal census. In July of 1803 a letter was awaiting him at the Frederick-town Post Office, however he was living in Adams County, Pennsylvania. He returned from Berwick Township and was listed as a resident of Frederick County on October 11, 1811, when he purchased the tract of land called Peter’s Promise. By 1820 he was living in Franklin Township, York County, Pennsylvania. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Charles Everett

School: Maryland

Middleburg “Frederick County, TO WIT. The State of Maryland, to the Sheriff of Frederick County, GREETING. We command you that you take Charles Everett, gunsmith, if he shall be found in you Bailiwick, and him safe keep so that you have his body before the Justices of our next County Court, to be held at the Court-House, in Frederick-Town, in and for the said County, on March 14, 1812, to satisfy unto Captain Shaffer as well the sum of fifteen dollars current money…promise to pay or cause to be paid unto the foresaid Shaffer the sum of $15 for breeding a bright bay mare colt. Joshua Delaplane of Double Pipe Creek celebrated eight year old mahogany bay horse named Telegraph. He sold the mare with fold and is liable to pay. {Frederick County Sheriff’s Warrant} For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Peter A. Favier

School: Maryland

Baltimore Peter A. Favier advertised at three different locations in Baltimore from 1837 until 1853. In 1852 he stated he was a gun, rifle and pistol maker, having constantly on hand a large and general assortment of doubles and single barrelled bird and ducking guns, rifle and pistols made to order. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Amos R. Fisher

School: Maryland

Cumberland Amos Fisher advertised in the 1880s as a gun and locksmith at 36 Polk Street, Cumberland. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Henry Fisher

School: Maryland

Frederick “I humbly beg the favour of you, to send me a Certificate to Exempt me and my People of the Militia Duty, by the Bearer M. Abraham – For which there Names is Jacob Reaser, Thomas Lawrence, Jacob Dunkle, Henry Fisher, Woodward Evitt, my Prentice is out now to Guard the Prisoners & my Captn. told me I should soon to on the Powder Guard, but if you will send me a Certificate, since I am in Contract with you, I shall be Exempt, when there is any Work to do for the Publick I always do it, and am willing to Oblige the Publick as much, in the Gun Way as I am able, which I think is more service to the Publick, as if I was to go with the Militia. I Petitioned to the Assembly to be Armorer for the County, which would be more Benefit to the Publick as Cast, I was informed by the Lieut. of the County that there was several Barrels in the Magazine which has no stocks, locks nor Mountain, so if you send me you Order to get them I shall add them to the November, as I have to make, and if you have the Power to get an Armorer I should be glad to serve. Sir I am your…Sevt. at…–Jacob Reaser.” {Maryland State Revolutionary War Papers, December 1778, Hall of Records, Annapolis} For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Nelson Fitzwater

School: Maryland

The federal census of 1860 for Randolph County, (West) Virginia, census listed Nelson Fitzwater as having been born in Maryland in 1816, working as a gunsmith. His wife Sarah, aged 34, and their children were born in Virginia. They were residing in the house of a shoemaker named John DeWitt. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

George Flegel

School: Maryland

Hagerstown The Maryland Herald & Hagers-Town Weekly Advertiser of Jan. 17, 1806, had a list of letters remaining in the Post Office in Hagers-Town. “George Fischach, George Flegel, care of George Kreps, Gunsmith.” Flegel was apparently in employment of Kreps in the gunsmith line as an apprentice or journeyman. In 1814 Flegel was armorer of the U.S. Arsenal in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and in 1819 Flegel was a Master Armorer there. During the period from 1820 to 1830 he was a gunsmith in private practice in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

John George

School: Maryland

Hagerstown He and his wife are listed in the 1790 federal census of Washington County with no children. In 1802 Thomas Shuman brought suit against Nicholas Hawken, Jacob Nichol and John George. From this legal action it can be assumed these three gunsmiths were associated in business. A letter was left at the Elizabeth Town Post Office for him in 1803 and 1804. A John George Jr. married Elizabeth Schlenker of Hagerstown in 1823. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

John Gonter

School: Maryland

Hagerstown Maryland. See “Maryland Longrifles” by Hartzler

Jacob Haeffer

School: Maryland

Frederick Jacob Haeffer was born in 1782 and was not known as a master gunsmith but as a journeyman. He can be found in the federal census of Frederick County in 1790. Within the next 10 years he was a freeman gunsmith in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. During the War of 1812 he returned to Frederick and can be found in the 1820 federal census. Jacob Haffer is shown on the roster of Capt. John Brengle’s Company of Frederick militia, which was raised in four hours in response to the invasion of Maryland. His will of June 15, 1827, is recorded in the Frederick County Courthouse. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. Jacob Heffner, 1 male under 10, 2 males 26-45, 1 female to 45. {1820 census; handwritten in the margin, “Died-last night in his forty fifth year of age Mr. Jacob Heffner of the county. Buried in the Lutheran graveyard of this city. {Diary of Jacob Engelbrecht, July 27, 1827} For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Jacob Harner

School: Maryland

Emmitsburg Jacob Harner was listed in the 1820 U.S. Census in Frederick County. He bought John Armstrong’s gunsmith tools for $28 on October 21, 1822. He is listed in the transaction as being from Frederick County. On June 13, 1827, he bought several lots, and in October of that year he is shown in a land transaction as residing in Adams County, Pennsylvania. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

James Harris

School: Maryland

Baltimore James Harris was born in 1820 in Maryland. He is listed from 1852-1876 at two locations in the Baltimore City Directories. In his first ad he mentioned rifles made to order. He was succeeded in 1877 by Edward Melchoir. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

James Haslett

School: Maryland

Baltimore James Haslett was born in 1773 in Ireland. Haslett was apprenticed int eh gunsmithing business in Europe to one of the most renowned lines of gunmakers. He came to America about 1798. His wife’s name was Mary and they settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They had three daughters and one son, who was his namesake. Haslett became superintendent in the arms factory of Robert McCormick. In 1803 he was working on his own in the City of Brotherly Love but came to Baltimore in June of that year. His superb work was highly favored throughout Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania. During the War of 1812 he was instrumental not making, but in purchasing, weapons for the state while serving as a major of the 11th Brigade, Maryland Militia. In later years he retired to his estate at Drum Point, Calvert County, where he died on August 15, 1833. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

George Hawken

School: Maryland

Hagerstown There are two mwn by the name of George Hawken during this period in Washington County and at least one was a gunsmith. George of Christian Sr. was born July 16, 1782. George of Christian Sr. was born Febuary 19, 1781. Both are recorded in the 1810 Federal census as residing in Elizabeth Town. The gunsmith, no doubt, was the one recorded in the July 5, 1809, local news sheet which revealed “married Sunday evening last by Rev. Rotroff, George Hawken to Miss Margaret Kreps, daughter of George Kreps, of this town.” The December 13, 1809, Maryland Herald and Elizabeth-Town Advertiser noted, “George Hawken, gunsmith, has lately commenced business in shop next door to John Kausler, 3rd door below bank.” In 1821 a George Hawken was working at the armory at Harpers Ferry. The only indenture for a George Hawken in the Washington County Courthouse was recorded on January 19, 1829, for the sale of a tract known as “Hit The Mark” in Washington County. At this time Jacob Hawken and George Hawken of Franklin County, Pennsylvania, as joint owners, conveyed the land to Henry Butterbaugh, who was also of Franklin County. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Jacob Hawken

School: Maryland

Hagerstown Jacob was born in 1785 or 1786, the third son of Christian Hawken Sr. He was employed at the National Armory at Harpers Ferry and after the War of 1812 he proceeded west and by 1818 was in St. Louis. With the death of his father in 1821 he returned to Hagerstown and married Catherine Allison in March of 1822. Returning to St. Louis he once again came home when he and a George Hawken disposed of the tract known as “Hit The Mark” on January 19, 1829. Jacob and his brother Samuel T. continued to make the famous half stock frontier guns in St. Louis. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

John Hawken

School: Maryland

John Hawken was born March 19, 1784, second son of Christian Hawken, while his parents were on the frontier in North Carolina for a short period of time. The October 4, 1809, local Hagerstown paper records “married last evening by Rev. Rotroff John Hawken to Miss Hannah Long, daughter of John Long of this county. “He was not listed in the equity case for the estate of his father in 1821, so apparently he was deceased. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Samuel T. Hawken

School: Maryland

Samuel T. Hawken was born October 26, 1792, the fourth son of Christian Sr. and Juliann Hawken. Samuel volunteered in Captain George Shryock’s Hagerstown militia during the War of 1812 and fought at Bladensburg. On June 14, 1815, he announced tht he had commenced the business in the shop occupied by his father in Hagerstown. On September 19, 1815, he married Rosanna Oster in Hagerstown and the following year moved to Xenia, Ohio, where his wife died on April24, 1821. He returned to Hagerstown with his three small children and, leaving them with his mother in early 1822, went to St. Louis, Missouri, and worked with his brother Jacob. He remarried Martha Ritchey, of Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, and he died in St. Louis at the age of 91. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

George & Andrew Jacobs

School: Maryland

Baltimore The 1860 federal census listed two gunsmiths, George and Andrew Jacobs, ages 22 and 20, residing at 32 Union St., Baltimore. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Keener John, I

School: Maryland

Baltimore John Keenerm, Sr. was born in 1771, a son of Peter Keener. He followed his father in the gunsmith trade. John and his father were gunsmiths at Green and North Streets, Baltimore. They advertised that they carried a large and extensive assortment of guns. John was married to Margaret and of this union John II and George were born. These sons became third generation gunsmiths. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Abraham Johnson

School: Maryland

Abraham Johnson (1793-1866). There are several superb guns known marked, “A. Johnson,” including a box-lock, pill-lock gun. The U.S. Census of 1850 showed Abram Johnson in Nottingham Township, Harrison County, Ohio, age 57, born in Maryland, gunsmith, with real estate valued at $3000. The estate of Abiram Johnson was appraised on 25 June 1866 by James Ross and others {Inventory Book J. p13}. It showed: 1 Draw Knife & Auger, $1.25 1 Hand Saw & Square, .50 1 Anvil, $2 2 Carpenter’s Planes, .40 1 Force Drill & Bits, .50 2 Blacksmith’s Hammers, $1 1 Hand Vice & Compasses, $1 7 Large Chisels, .50 2 Iron Saws, 1 Screwdriver, 2 awls, .25 1 Hand Guide & Brace Bit, .10 2 Chisels,.37; 2 Augers, .50 1 Screwplate & 1 Wrench, $2 1 Blacksmith’s Vice, $5 1 Smoothing Plane, .10 pair Pincers, Chisel, Scribe Awl, .40 For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Joseph W. Keller

School: Maryland

Hagerstown On April 9, 1841, Joseph W. Keller and William Cookman advertised that they had commenced the gunsmithing business at the old stand lately occupied by William Hawken on Jonathan Street between Washington and Franklin in Hagerstown, where George Hawken had briefly worked. They manufactured guns, rifles and pistols of every description but the business was taken over again by William Hawken after five years. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

M. Kreps

School: Maryland

Washington County In the 1860 federal census M. Kreps was listed as an armorer at the Harpers Ferry Arsenal. He was born in Maryland in 1822. Martin was married to Magdalena Kreps and resided in Hagerstown where he worked as a joiner. He died suddenly on May 9, 1806 in Baltimore and his wife, over the next few years, disposed of his property. It is not known if the gunsmith M. Kreps was of this family. Wife Susanna Kreps, born December 31, 1789, died October 21, 1818. {Washington County Cemetery Records, Page 263} Michael Kreps, born May 28, 1784, died December 9, 1835. Michael Kreps died September 28, 1867, aged 67 years, 6 months and 3 days. Wife Mary Kreps. {Washington County Cemetery Records, Page 232} Michael Kreps of Williamsport married Miss Mary Hoffman in 1820. He must have had a second marriage because in December of 1830 his daughter, Miss Margaret Kreps, married Cephas Bartleson of Williamsport. Mr. Kreps could also refer to Marvin T. Kreps who was born in 1823 and was employed as an armorer at the Southern Federal Armory or it could refer to on of the above. Marvin’s wife was named Margaret and they had eight children. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

William Kreps

School: Maryland

Hagerstown William Kreps had six transactions of property, one mortage, one release, the purchase of one slave and one bill of sale in the Washington County Courthouse during his lifetime. He also participated in the purchase of ground for the Mount Zion Reform Church. His first deed for $260 current money on April 2, 1798, was for the property of gunsmith Ernst Dietz. On December 19, 1800, he also purchased from gunsmith John Gonter his house for $500. A mortage indenture was from gunsmith George Kreps Sr. on July 5, 1811. He was known as a gunsmith and hatter. On May 2, 1804, Kreps formed a partnership with George Binkley in the dry goods and grocery business that was formerly Geroge Binkley and Co. This partnership was dissolved in September of the same year. The mortgage holder George Sr. and William were both active in the fire company in 1808. He was appointed postmaster of Elizabeth Town on April 10, 1807. In the 1820 Washington County census there are two William Kreps. One of them was a member of the building committee of the German Reform Church at Cavetown when the corner stone was laid on August 8, 1827. The William Kreps who was later a post-master died in his 51st year on March 4, 1822. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Daniel Lewis

School: Maryland

The 1880 federal census of Preston County, West Virginia, showed Daniel Lewis as a gunsmith, age 34, born in Maryland, with a wife named Susan. He was a partner in the gun business with G. A. Licle For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Daniel Marker

School: Maryland

No biographical information available.

Daniel Marker, Jr.

School: Maryland

Sharpsburg He was born in 1810 the fourth child of Daniel Sr. and Christina Beckenbaugh Marker. Daniel Jr. probably began learning the gunsmith trade under his father. when Daniel, Sr., moved to Martinsburg, (West) Virginia, Daniel Jr. would have been 12 years old. Therefore, he probably continued his training under either his grandfather, if he was a gunsmith, or his uncle George Jr. In 1831 as a master, Daniel Jr. opened his shop in Martinsburg where his father had previously been. The April 4, 1833, Virginia Republican carried an ad for Daniel Jr. showing that he had moved his shop to the corner of Burke and Queen Streets in the cabinet shop formerly occupied by James S. Boyd. In 1840 he married Catherine Sutten and resided near Sharpsburg. The year 1841 was the last year he was paying taxes in Martinsburg. He continued to reside in the Sharpsburg area and his will is recorded on October 19, 1891. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. “Marksmen! Attention! Daniel Marker, Sr., Daniel Marker, Jr., George Marker and Peter Marker will shoot with rifles, off hand, against any four men in Washington County, for, from 50 to 100 dollars. The time, place, and manner of shooting, to be agreed on when the challenge is accepted.” {Martinsburg Gazette, 2 March 1826} “Lock and Gunsmithing – Daniel Marker, Jun. – Having commenced the above business on Queen Street, a few doors below the Market House, would respectfully inform the public that he is now ready to fill any orders where with he may be furnished in the above branches of the business. He will make and repair guns of every description – Make and repair Door Locks of all kinds, besides all the various branches appertaining to the Locksmith business – Being determined to attend strictly to business and do his work in the best style, he hopes to receive (as he intends to merit) a share of Public patronage.” {Martinsburg Gazette, July 7, 1831} For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

George Marker, Jr.

School: Maryland

Middletown Valley George Marker, Jr., was born January 19, 1780, the third child of George Sr. and Mary Mohler Marker. His presumed mentor was probably his older brother Daniel. In May of 1801 he married Margaret Strum. He remained near the family homestead “Marker’s Delight” until 1816 when he purchased property in Election District 4. In 1823 he and his family moved to Germantown Pike near Ellerton in Montgomery County, Ohio, and, in the move, lost the indenture papers of his slaves. Two years later he moved to just south of Liberty, Ohio. The eleven children were all born in Maryland except for the youngest. George Jr. died on November 29, 1854. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. George Marker, 4 males under 10, 2 males 10-16, 1 male 16-18, 2 males 18-26, 2 males 26-45, 1 female to 16, 1 female to 45. {1820 Frederick County census, District 4} For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Jacob Marker

School: Maryland

Sharpsburg Jacob Marker was born in 1832 the son of James and Amelia Naeff Marker. He was raised in the Sharpsburg area and, after working with his father in the gun business, took over the gunshop in 1855. In 1869 Jacob made his first real estate purchase, jointly with his father, in sharpsburg. He was elected sheriff of Washington County in 1875 and his last indenture was recorded in 1890. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Alexander McComas

School: Maryland

Baltimore Alexander McComas was born near Bel Air in Harford County on February 27, 1821, a son of Preston McComas and was named after his grandfather. At the age of 13 his father brought him to Baltimore and placed him with Charles C.C. O’Brien to learn arms manufacturing. He remained with O’Brien for six years and , upon the death of his master, was bound to an un-named simth to finish his remaining three years. In July of 1843 he established his own business at 51 South Calvert Street. He became one of the Monumental City’s most prolific producers. During craftsmanship competitions at the Maryland Institute and the Metropolitan Mechanics’ Institute he won many awards. In 1844 he married Mary A. Hahn. There are only two known apprentices to McComas which have come to light: John Clenney and Oscar Johnson. His son, Harry H. McComas, was associated with him in the business. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Nathaniel Melchoir

School: Maryland

Baltimore Nathaniel Melchoir was born in Germany in 1808. He became a gunsmith in Baltimore by 1840. His wife’s name was Henriette. While he was making guns there were three other gunsmiths with the surname of Melchoir: Edward Melchoir, Harman Melchoir and Edward Melchoir. All worked during the 1860 period at different addresses. Nathaniel’s death was recorded on September 15, 1879. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Jacob Metzger

School: Maryland

Learned gunsmithing in Lancaster Pennsylvania. Worked in Frederick Maryland.

Jacob Metzger, Sr.

School: Maryland

Frederick Census records reveal that Jacob Metzger, Sr., was born during the mid 1760s and was learning the gunsmith trade in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, probably with Jacob Groff, during the Revolution. His shop was located on East King St., near DeMuth’s Tocacco Shop. On January 15, 1788, he purchased lot No. 5 in Fredericktown. His wife, Christiana, was born in Lancaster County on July 14, 1766. A son, Jacob Jr., was born to them on January 1, 1789. Jacob Sr.’s last will and testament was written on June 19, 1826, and the will was probated on October 9, 1837. Jacob Metzger, Jr. may have followed his father’s trade bacause, in 1856, a gunsmith by the name of Jacob T. Metzger, who may have been a grandson to Jacob Sr., was working in Lancaster on North Queen Street above Orange Street. By 1863 that man was working in Hamilton, Ohio, and in 1879 Montgomery County, Indiana. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. Jacob Metzker, 1 male 10-16, 1 male 26-45, 4 females under 10, 1 female 26-45. {1800 Frederick County census} Jacob Metzker, 2 males under 10, 1 male 10-16, 1 male 45 & up, 2 females under 10, 1 female to 26, 1 female to 45, 1 female 45 and up. {1820 Frederick County census, District 3} For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Charles, A. Pagenhardt

School: Maryland

Westernport In 1853 Charles A. Pagenhardt and William Shaw, his presumed mentor, purchased property in Westernport and workded together in the gunsmith trade. The property was taken over by Pagenhardt in in 1857 when Shaw moved to Grantsville. Charles had seven other land transactions with the last being in 1873. His son, Leonard E. Pagenhardt, advertised as a gun and locksmith in the late percussion period. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Leonard, E. Pagenhardt

School: Maryland

Cumberland Leonard was the son of Charles A. Pagenhardt who made guns and pistols at Westernport. After the War Between the States, Leonard advertised as a gun and locksmith at 62 North Mechanic Street in Cumberland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Thomas Patton

School: Maryland

Hagerstown Thomas Patton offers reward for a filly missing from Mr. Henderson’s Meadow near Hagerstown. {The Maryland Herald & Elizabeth-Town Advertiser, January 2, 1800} Gun-Smiths Wanted. The subscribers wish to engage the following workmen–one good Mounting or Bayonet Forger, two good Filers and one or two good Polishers, to such they will give generous wages.–Any person can find the road from Winchester to this place. WHEELER & HOME Washington, Culpepper, Oct. 17, 1800. ANY of our friends and acquaintances, that should incline to come here; we the subscriber, working in the above employ, certify, that the employer and place we are perfectly pleased with. FRANCIS DOWLER, GEORGE BRENISE, THOMAS PATTON, JOHN RESOR, JOHN KAYLER, MICHAEL NICOL, PETER LINK. {Maryland Herald & Elizabeth-Town Advertiser, October 30, 1800} Letters remaining at the Post Office at Frederick Town — Thomas Patton. {Bartgis’s Republican Gazette, January 4, 1805} For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

George Piper

School: Maryland

Emmitsburg George Piper was born in 1783, a son of Peter Piper. He was bound on August 31, 1801, to John Armstrong to learn the gunsmith and lockmaking trade. After completing his apprenticeship he worked in York County, Pennsylvania. Peter Piper died in Franklin Township, Adams County, Pennsylvania, and left equal shares of his worldly goods to all his children except George. “He is not th have an equal share with my other children.” On 4 February an advertisement in the Adams County Sentinel offered a reward for a stolen rifle. The gun had been left at John Settel’s Gunshop for repairs but picked up under false pretenses by George Piper. The name of George Piper, gunsmith, appears on the tax lists of 1842-43 in Hopewell Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. We do not know what happened to Piper thereafter. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

John, L. Pipino

School: Maryland

Baltimore John L. Pipino was born in 1827 in Germany. He opened up a gun shop the same year as his brother, Jacob C. Pipino, on 16 Mercer Street in Baltimore. In 1851 he was located at 46 1/2 Harrison Street, 1867 at Cross Street near Shop and 1868 at Peach Alley near Cross. This was the last listing where he was self employed. After this time he was either employed with his brother or went to Illionis where he is recorded in the state gazetteer as a single freeman gunsmith working into the 1880s. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Lewis Pipino

School: Maryland

Baltimore Lewis Pipino was born on December 25, 1839, in Bier, Bavaria. He came to this country with his brother Jacob C. Pipino in the mid 1840s and learned the gunsmith trade in Baltimore. He was employed as a gunsmith with his brother at 20 Ensor Street. In 1859 he enlisted in the U.S. Army and was sent to the West. Upon being discharged during the War Between the States he returned home and re-enlisted as a private on January 14, 1864, in Company C, 8th Maryland Regiment Infantry. At Hatcher’s Run, Virginia, he was wounded on October 26, 1864. Lewis was transferred to Company C, First Maryland Infantry and was discharged on July 2, 1865. After the war, he continued his military careet by re-enlisting in the 2nd U.S. Cavalry. He was again sent west. He was discharged on September 20, 1873, at Fort Laramie, Dakota Territory. He returned to Baltimore in 1875 and died on May 23, 1924, at the U.S. Soldier’s Home in Washington, D.C. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Mathias Rentenburger

School: Maryland

Baltimore The 1860 Baltimore census lists him as being a gunsmith, 37 years of age, and residing at 710 Baltimore St. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Peter Resor

School: Maryland

Hagerstown Peter was one of the sons of Mathias Roesser and learned the gunsmith trade from his father in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. When his father died in 1771 he acquired the family homestead, but sold it to his brother-in-law Jacob Kraft, who was also a gunsmith. About 1785 Peter and his family moved to Elizabeth Town where he continued his trade. During the War of 1812 he moved about 15 miles up the Valley to Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, and spent his later years in Lancaster where he died in 1823. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

George, II Rizer

School: Maryland

Cumberland He was born about 1790 a son of George I. Joshua Devou was bound to him on May 16, 1819, to learn the blacksmith trade as was Charles Bennett on December 15 of the same year. His personal assets are recorded in Cumberland – Its Foundation and Growth as being $200.00. He was married to Margaret Hoffman Rizer and his will of Ocotber 26, 1862, was probated on July 9, 1864. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Martin II Rizer

School: Maryland

Wills Town and Cumberland The second Martin Rizer was born before 1755 a son of Martin I and Anna Rizer. He or his father was connected in the gunmaking business with Philip Sheetz in Martinsburg, (West) Virginia, and there were legal actions against him in 1789. He or his father was then imprisoned for eight days. After disposing of his 400 acres of Berkeley County property he settled in the Wills Town area. He was recorded as having personal assets of $135.00 in Cumberland – Its Foundation and Growth. Daniel Sells was apprenticed to him to learn the art or trade of gunsmith on August 13, 1799. John Riley was also bound for the gunsmith trade on December 13, 1803 and Bazel Smith Jr. on August 31, 1805. On January 22, 1814, John Cumberly Jr. became his student to learn blacksmithing. Martin II died in 1815 and his estate was appraised on January 4, 1816. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Nathaniel Rowe

School: Maryland

Name also spelled Row. Apprenticed to John Armstrong.

Marine Tyler Wickham

School: Maryland

Emmitsburg Marine Tyler Wickham was born on January 3, 1780. On March 11, 1799, his mother bound this orphan to John Armstrong to learn the trade of a gunsmith and a locksmith. After completing his training in 1801 he worked in the gunsmith business with a man by the name of Matthews. In the 1800 census there were seven Matthews families in the Emmitsburg area. During 1802 Wickham purchased lot No. 11 in Emmitsburg and the two smiths continues working together. In the summer of 1804 he came to the Harpers Ferry. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Amos W. Wolf

School: Maryland

Amos W. Wolf was a gunsmith in Terra Alta, Preston County, (West) Virginia. He chose to fight with the Union Army and his only apparent association with Maryland was his enlistment in Captain Will Falkenstine’s Frederick Company of the 3rd Maryland Federal Regiment in March of 1864. He served as a regimental armorer and gunsmith. He then returned to Preston County where he continued to farm and make home rifles. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.

Elmer P. Wolf

School: Maryland

Frederick County Elmer P. Wolf was born March 31, 1868, a son of Herman and Mary Gordon Wolf. He was reared at Foxville and learned the gunsmithing trade from his father. He married Eliza Jane Stottlemyer and had a sawmill and made guns in Eyler’s Valley north of Thurmont. For further reference, see Arms Makers of Maryland. For additional information see Maryland Longrifles Hartzler/Whisker.